Topic: Military Families

‘When They Came Home They Were on Their Own’—National Guard Grapples With Suicide Rate

As things got worse, death itself became a means of intervention: Funerals reunited buddies, and they quietly identified who could be next.
Military experts constantly warn service members about social media scams that can affect them and their families. Graphic by Regina Ali, courtesy of the U.S. Department of Defense.

Preying on Patriots—Scams More Likely to Target Troops, Vets

A steady income and benefits, a desire to help, frequent moves and deployments, and more make military members and families particular targets of scammers.

More Than 40% of Troops Face Limited or No Access to Abortion Care, Study Shows

Even before the Supreme Court struck down Roe v. Wade, abortion care for military women was extremely limited.

War Horse Managing Editor Recognized by VA Secretary for Toxic Exposure Reporting

“Kelly told the human stories of soldiers, sailors, airmen, Marines, and families who were suffering, so we as a nation would not, and could not, forget.”
Sean Paul, left, and his gunner charcoaled their faces as Iraq launched scud missiles just after U.S. troops crossed the border. Troops used charcoal as a way to absorb any chemical agents as they donned their gas masks. Photo courtesy of the author.

Note to Self: When They Come for You in the Night, Don’t Give Up. Fight Back. 

Through it all—the good and the bad—always remember you will achieve your goal. Keep your chin up, endure, and always remember: It will be OK.
The 2018 NORAD Tracks Santa Operation Center at Peterson Air Force Base, Colorado, on Christmas Eve. Photo by Staff Sgt. Alexandra M. Longfellow, courtesy of the U.S. Air Force.

‘Faster Than Starlight’—How Troops Track Santa’s Trek Across the Globe

How does Santa do it? A lot of it is classified, but Santa most likely operates within his own space-time continuum.

Veterans-Turned-Poll Workers Defend Democratic Elections Against Threats Foreign and Domestic

Recruiting veterans to work as poll workers could harness the energy of veterans looking for new ways to serve their country.
Retired Army Capt. Katie Blanchard speaks with a nurse before surgery Sept. 6, 2019, at Wilford Hall Ambulatory Surgical Center, Joint Base San Antonio-Lackland, Texas. A coworker Blanchard had reported as threatening poured gasoline over her and lit her on fire. Blanchard could not recover damages from the government because of the Feres Doctrine. Photo by Tech. Sgt. Katherine Spessa, courtesy of the U.S. Air Force.

Feres Helps Military Avoid Accountability for Harm. New Ruling Could Be a Chance for Justice.

For decades, the Feres doctrine has protected the military from lawsuits over things like training mishaps, medical malpractice, and sexual assault.

“Quietly Heroic”—Journalist Returns to Ukraine with American Veterans to Help Her People

There’s a long legacy of women fighting in wars, and they’re always welcome behind the scope of a rifle pointing at Russian invaders.